Open-range management and property rights in pastoral Africa
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Open-range management and property rights in pastoral Africa a case of spontaneous range enclosure in South Darfur, Sudan by Roy H. Behnke

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Published by Agricultural Administrative Unit, Overseas Development Institute in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Sudan.

Subjects:

  • Inclosures -- Sudan.,
  • Range management -- Sudan.,
  • Land use, Rural -- Sudan.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Roy H. Behnke.
SeriesPaper / Pastoral Development Network ;, 20f, Paper (Pastoral Development Network (Overseas Development Institute)) ;, 20f.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGN387 .P36 no. 20f, HD977.Z63 .P36 no. 20f
The Physical Object
Pagination29 p. :
Number of Pages29
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2325028M
LC Control Number86209817

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  In post-colonial Africa, land reform programs to register rangeland as private or group property were exploited by well-connected and literate individuals at the expense of the majority of pastoral land users, which further undermined indigenous collective management institutions (Peters, ; Rutten, ; Perkins, ). In dryland Africa, access to land and water resources are central to pastoral livelihood activities. Policy intervention in these regions represents the outcome of concerted post-independence processes in which countries have committed to land tenure transformation as a policy objective. This was meant to create private, liberal property rights to replace communal customary tenure systems Cited by: 4. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), competition over land has intensified over the last few decades due to urbanisation, agricultural intensification, conservation initiatives and privatisation of communal lands through rangeland policies that have sought to create private, liberal property rights to replace communal customary systems. The two opposing views in this debate are focussed on either Cited by: 4.   In the newly published book, Pastoralism and common pool resources - rangeland co-management, property rights and access in Mongolia, author Undargaa ‘puts property in its place’. Using Mongolia as a case study, Undargaa highlights the inability of contemporary institutional theories to adequately recognize other production components of the mobile pastoral economy, such as labour .

institutions serve, and fail to serve, the pastoral economy and resources upon which it is based are still contested. In the newly published book, Pastoralism and common pool resources - rangeland co-management, property rights and access in Mongolia, author Undargaa ‘puts property in its place’. Using Mongolia as a case study. ism, combined with the inability of pastoral groups to influence the decisions that affect their lives and to hold government to account, is perpetuating a vi-cious circle of pastoral poverty and conflict, thereby reinforcing the very preconceptions underpinning policy directives for pastoral development in much of East Africa. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. With the colonisation of East Africa, pastoral communities in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda found themselves isolated by colonial land policies. The theory of property rights (which is the.

rangeland management practices on vegetation structure and aboveground biomass. The changing roles of women in pastoral areas of Somaliland presents a glimpse of gender issues. A capstone findings and provisional recommendations regarding environmental impacts of land management in pastoralist and wildlife eco-tourism co-. Drawing on the classic work of Elir Ostrom and the readings of political ecology, this book questions the application of exclusive property rights to mobile pastoralism and rangeland resource governance. It argues that this approach inadequately represents property relations in the context of Mongolian pastoralism.   He touches on the stark distinction flourishing informal sector with its pragmatic approach to property and the stagnant formal sector which remains a stumbling block to the efficient utilization of rights to physical and intellectual property, and produces evidence to show that the pragmatism of the latter in actual fact goes back to pre-colonial times. responsive to the uniqueness of the pastoral system are primarily to blame for pastoral vulnerability. The study on which this Synthesis Paper is based reviews current policies and practice towards pastoralism of governments, development agents and pastoral communities in the Horn and East Africa. It also analyses the impact of current.